Test Bank For The Unfinished Nation A Concise History of the American People 8Th Edition By Alan Brinkley

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Test Bank For The Unfinished Nation A Concise History of the American People 8Th Edition By Alan Brinkley

Chapter 03 Society and Culture in Provincial America Key

1. (p. 55) Most seventeenth-century English immigrants to the North American colonies were

A. commercial agents.

B. landowners.

C. laborers.

D. aristocrats.

E. religious dissenters.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: The Colonial Population
 

2. (p. 55) In the seventeenth century, the great majority of English immigrants who came to the Chesapeake region were

A. women.

B. religious dissenters.

C. convicts.

D. indentured servants.

E. slaves.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: The Colonial Population
 

3. (p. 55-57) Which of the following was NOT characteristic of the English indenture system?

A. The presence of indentured servants was a source of social unrest.

B. Most indentured servants received land upon completion of their contracts.

C. Female indentured servants constituted one-fourth of the total arrivals.

D. Female indentured servants were typically not allowed to marry while under contract.

E. Contracts for indenture generally lasted four to five years.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: The Colonial Population
 

4. (p. 58) By 1700, English colonial landowners began to rely more heavily on African slavery in part because

A. landowners in the southern colonies became less capable of paying indentured servant wages.

B. of worsening economic conditions in England.

C. colonial parliaments passed laws improving the status of indentured servants.

D. the English government had come to discourage the practice of indenture.

E. of a declining birthrate in England.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: The Colonial Population
 

5. (p. 58) Regarding colonial life expectancy during the seventeenth century,

A. life expectancy in New England was exceptionally high.

B. backcountry settlers had a similar life expectancy to that of settlers in coastal areas.

C. life expectancy was highest in the southern colonies.

D. one in two white children in the Chesapeake died in infancy.

E. men had a shorter life expectancy than women.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: The Colonial Population
 

6. (p. 58) During the seventeenth century, English colonists in the Chesapeake saw

A. women significantly outnumber men.

B. an increasingly unbalanced sex ratio.

C. eight out of ten children dying in infancy.

D. few single adults.

E. a life expectancy for men of just over forty years.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: The Colonial Population
 

7. (p. 58) By 1775, the non-Indian population of the English colonies was just over

A. 2 million.

B. 4 million.

C. 1 million.

D. 6 million.

E. 8 million.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: The Colonial Population
 

8. (p. 58-59) In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, medical practitioners

A. became increasingly professionalized.

B. grew to understand the link between bacteria and infection.

C. had little or no knowledge of sterilization.

D. rejected purging and bleeding as medical techniques.

E. were nearly all males.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: The Colonial Population
 

9. (p. 59) The seventeenth-century medical practice of deliberately bleeding a person was based on

A. Calvinist religious doctrine.

B. scientific experimentation and observation.

C. evidence that it helped in the recovery from illness.

D. practices acquired from Indians.

E. the belief that a person needed to maintain a balance of different bodily fluids.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: The Colonial Population
 

10. (p. 59) In the seventeenth century, white women in the colonial Chesapeake

A. bore an average of four children apiece.

B. generally married later than in England.

C. averaged one pregnancy for every two years of marriage.

D. generally had a longer life expectancy than their husbands.

E. rarely engaged in premarital sex.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: The Colonial Population
 

11. (p. 59) Compared to women in colonial Chesapeake, New England women

A. lost their husbands earlier in life.

B. were more likely to become widows.

C. were more likely to have their family remain intact.

D. had fewer children.

E. had much less legal authority in their marriages.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: The Colonial Population
 

12. (p. 60) In colonial New England,

A. strict parental control made premarital sexual relations almost nonexistent.

B. dowries were a common feature of marriage.

C. gender equality was reinforced by the prevailing culture.

D. choosing a spouse independent of a parent’s wishes was common.

E. widows tended not to remarry.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: The Colonial Population
 

13. (p. 60) In colonial New England Puritan communities, women

A. were expected to devote themselves to serving the needs of their husbands and households.

B. were not highly valued.

C. were more likely to become pregnant before marriage than in the South.

D. were considered to be socially equal to males.

E. could not be official members of the church.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: The Colonial Population
 

14. (p. 60) In colonial New England Puritan communities, the family was

A. neither highly valued nor expected to be under the authority of women.

B. both highly valued and expected to be under the authority of women.

C. highly valued.

D. marked by relatively loose parental supervision.

E. expected to be under the authority of women.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: The Colonial Population
 

15. (p. 61) The term middle passage refers to the movement of enslaved Africans

A. from the coastal regions of colonies to their interiors.

B. from Africa to Europe.

C. between individual North American colonies.

D. from Africa to the New World.

E. from the Caribbean to the mainland colonies.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: The Colonial Population
 

16. (p. 61) The total number of Africans forcibly brought to all of the Americas as slaves is estimated to have been as many as

A. 7 million.

B. 4 million.

C. 11 million.

D. 19 million.

E. 26 million.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: The Colonial Population
 

17. (p. 61) During the seventeenth century, the Royal African Company of England

A. lowered the prices of slaves in order to increase their sale in the North American colonies.

B. sent the majority of its enslaved Africans directly to the Chesapeake colonies.

C. deliberately restricted the supply of slaves to the North American colonies.

D. would only ship adult African men in the slave trade.

E. stopped importing slaves directly from Africa.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: The Colonial Population
 

18. (p. 61) Which statement regarding slavery in English North America in 1700 is FALSE?

A. The demand for slaves led to a steady rise in the prices paid for them.

B. Blacks outnumbered whites in some areas.

C. Blacks were heavily concentrated in a few southern colonies.

D. There were twice as many black men as black women.

E. There were about 25,000 slaves in the colonies.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: The Colonial Population
 

19. (p. 63) In English North American colonies, the application of slave codes was based on color and

A. origin of birth.

B. religion.

C. nothing more.

D. economic status.

E. laboring skills.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: The Colonial Population
 

20. (p. 63) In comparing the colonial societies of Spanish America and English America, people of mixed races had a

A. higher status than pure Africans in Spanish America.

B. lower status than pure Africans in Spanish America.

C. higher status than pure Africans in both Spanish and English America.

D. higher status than pure Africans in English America.

E. lower status than pure Africans in both Spanish and English America.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: The Colonial Population
 

21. (p. 65) The largest contingent of immigrants during the colonial period were the

A. Palatinate Germans.

B. Irish Catholics.

C. Moravians and Mennonites.

D. Scotch-Irish.

E. French Huguenots.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: The Colonial Population
 

22. (p. 65) The seventeenth-century tobacco economy of the Chesapeake region

A. went through numerous boom-and-bust cycles.

B. often saw production not meet demand.

C. saw prices rise steadily throughout the period.

D. saw planters cut back on production as a way of raising prices.

E. was concentrated on many small farms with few slaves.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: The Colonial Economies
 

23. (p. 65) Rice production in colonial America

A. represented a new crop to most Africans.

B. was found mostly in the Chesapeake colonies.

C. relied largely on free white labor.

D. mostly occurred in inland regions.

E. was very difficult and unhealthy work.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: The Colonial Economies
 

24. (p. 66) Which statement about the economy of the northern colonies is true?

A. Conditions for farming were more favorable than in the southern colonies.

B. The economy was more diverse than in the southern colonies.

C. New England was able to develop several major export crops.

D. Agriculture was not the dominant industry of the economy.

E. Planters were more likely to rely on slave labor.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: The Colonial Economies
 

25. (p. 66) The first significant metals industry in the colonies was developed for

A. silver.

B. steel.

C. iron.

D. gold.

E. brass.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: The Colonial Economies

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